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Registered Charity No 1107014
©BCMA 2006 all rights reserved
Bromley Childminding Association

So What is A Learning Story?

It is a folder that you gradually build up the contents of, to evidence the learning and development of the child.

This evidence can be:

  • written observations, linked to the Birth to three matters framework or the Foundation Stage Curriculum depending on the age/stage of the child
  • Photographs of the child participating in different activities
  • Examples of their ‘work’ for example a picture they have drawn
  • Notes you have made and any other relevant information

 

Why make a Learning Story?

  • It provides a record of the child’s learning and development for parents to keep
  • It provides valuable information to a teacher when the child starts school, or to another carer, when the child moves on
  • It is a lovely document to share with the child and encourages them to remember previous activities and outings.

 

How do I start?

  • Make some observations, they don’t have to be long pages of notes, sometimes just  a few words are enough to capture what has happened. You could use post it notes, or a notebook, whatever you feel most comfortable with. Link your observation to either the Birth to three matters framework or the Foundation Stage Curriculum. You might like to colour code your pages that you mount your observations on, in line with the colours of the Birth to three matters framework. Note down how you intend to develop this learning, i.e. What next?
  • Take photographs of the child doing all sorts of activities, mount onto card or paper (again could be colour co-ordinated) and add a line or two. This could  be a brief explanation, for example ‘John enjoyed sorting the toy mini-beasts in the soil tray’ followed up with a quote from the framework/curriculum….’Provide stimulating materials for young children to match, sort, classify and categorise’ A Competent Learner, Making Connections.
  • Examples of their work. This could include paintings, stampings, drawings or photographic evidence of what they have made. It is important not to get too caught up with the end products as it is the process that is more important.
  • Anything else that you feel adds to the child’s learning story. This could include a leaflet on a place you have visited with a note saying what the child enjoyed most.
  • Make the folder interesting by adding a photograph of the child to the front cover
  • You might like to include a simple questionnaire that the child has completed with you (if they are old enough) about what they like/dislike, what interests them etc. This will then help you to evaluate your provision from their point of view.
  • You could give the child a camera and encourage them to take photographs. Include some of these in the file with a brief explanation. It will give the learning story a real snapshot of how the child views their environment.
     

 

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‘Learning stories’ are a great way of recording a child’s learning and development.

They  are easy to put together and are an excellent tool for planning future activities for the child, based on their interests and abilities.

LEARNING STORIES

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Learning Stories

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BCMA Contact Books
from £2.50 including postage

An ideal way to work in partnership with parents and to demonstrate to Ofsted that  you are sharing information

For ages 0-3 years, easy to use and enough pages to last 6 months!

 

Books also available at Drop-Ins or via our online PAYMENTS CENTRE*

* small handling fee applies
 

Please contact us to order by email

click on the book to see a larger image